220. Detail and Edges, iii

In the spirit of details and edges to convey perspective, as well as the fact I was really intrigued by the water and rocks and such from yesterday’s painting, I went to Rick Surowicz’s YouTube channel.  I know he has a lot of videos, some which feature flowing water.  I chose his study “Rushing Waters” to practice detail and edges along with perspective.  

I am rather pleased with the way my version of this study came out.  As I do these practice studies, I find I am beginning to rely on myself more and more for painting.  In other words, 6 months ago I would bemoan the fact that my painting does not look like the photo or the painting I was using as a study.  Now, while I look and learn from the instructions, I also am comfortable making my own painting decisions.

I really like Surowicz’s work.  His attention to detail and ability to explain his process of painting really helps the person attempting to learn.  This kind of knowledge sinks in with time, and it’s a lot of fun to see one’s own progress both on paper and in one’s head . . .

Some Thoughts

When I do studies like this one, and am pleased with the results, I think one day I will be a good painter.  When?  That is the question.  Copying someone’s work is pretty easy once you get the hang of it – but what about producing original paintings which are not copies and practice studies of another’s?

I know that we all need to practice what we want to learn.  Sometimes, though, it would be nice to “get there” more often than not!

4 thoughts on “220. Detail and Edges, iii

  1. I like the depth of the colors and the foam on the water. I wonder if it would be possible to go even finer/thicker with the white lines for the foam. Currently there seems to be a certain stereotypical thickness. Maybe I missed something in the technique.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yul, very observant! I used a bottle with a pin in it to disperse the frisket liquid. I could try to paint over some of the lines with color and then use an opaque white gouache. As well, I might try using something with a very narrow edge for the frisket, which is a real pain to apply, but very useful.

      Liked by 1 person

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