Pencil Time

After my attempts at a portrait of a person, the realization was that my shading skills are not really good.  Also, my Pencil Portraits class recommences on 2/17, so I thought it might be a worthwhile endeavor to work with a pencil, and work on value with the pencil.  This certainly will benefit any studies I do in the Pencil Portraits class, and perhaps get it into my thick skull to think a lot more about gradation and value than I do!  (Magpie Brain loves bright colors.)

I am very fond of the books by Alphonso Dunn on ink drawing.  His work is phenomenal, and I have learned a lot through his exercises.  Given this, I decided to apply some of his studies to pencil work rather than ink.  All of these exercises come from his Pen and Ink Drawing Workbook.

Above, is the first one I attempted.  If you look closely, you can see the page numbers in the sketches (enlarge the images by clicking on them).  These studies were outlines with a choice of light direction.  You have to use your imagination!

Shapes and shadows – reflected light, cast shadows, highlights.  Simple forms and then a rather pathetic toucan.

I particularly enjoyed employing the pen-into-pencil of these drawings in Mr. Dunn’s book.  His are obviously rendered in black and white, with shades of grey determined by pen strokes.  Here, I took his studies and applied pencil – graphite – to them.  They include a cabbage (I know, it looks like a brain), mushroom, hammer, and bow tie.  Each has a different set of textures.  I started to visualize where the light source was, and that really helped me start thinking more about what I was doing.

For all of these, I used a 2B pencil and a sketchbook, along with referring to Penn and Ink Drawing Workbook examples.

Inktober #12: Whale (Shark)

Yes, there are really fish called whale sharks!  In looking up pictures of whales, I came across this creature, and if you look at online images, you will see it is a beautifully patterned shark, as well as learn that it migrates long distances, and is a gentle animal, feeding on plankton and such as it swims along.  I thought it was so beautiful that it had to be the Inktober #12 offering.

The weekend was super busy, so I am a bit behind with my Inktober commitment, but the commitment continues.  It would be really easy to let it just fall behind – like a diet – so the focus of Inktober may be more important than the drawings themselves.  Inktober is a challenge to not only commitment, but to imagination and dedication to meeting a goal.  Harder than I thought it would be – but at least I have some time for commitment these days.

 

Inktober #3: Roasted

Well, there are political roasts, and roast chicken, and roasted peppers.  And coffee!  I do love my coffee – thus, my tribute to “roasted” for Inktober #3!

I must say, I have not expected to see where this Inktober challenge led me.  I thought something really simple, like some roasted bell peppers, but instead, I started thinking of integrating one sketch (coffee beans) with another (coffee plant) and then a coffee cup, and finally, a tribute to Columbian coffee, which is really misspelled and should be “Colombian.”  Oh, well.

This is done with pen-and-ink along with water-soluble graphite.

Inktober #2: Tranquil

Breathe in.  Breathe out.  Breathe in.  Breathe out.

How often do we get to slow down?  To be tranquil is to relax, to be in the moment, to be calm, to be-here-now.

My contributions for the day!  First, a rock “duck” – that intriguingly simple pile of rocks, small or large, by the beach, a stream, or on a mountain top.  To me, the epitome of zen.

And then, the peace and comfort of a good friend or loved one.

I used a water brush and water-soluble graphite, specifically as illustrated below.