147. In the Woods

Inktober is done and gone . . . this past week I’ve been sewing like a fiend, last night there was a mass shooting down the road from us with a thirteen people killed and eighteen wounded – more –  there are fires to the east and west of us, and the wind is blowing like crazy.  There is peace in ink.

143. Inktober 25: Prickly

Today I present you with the teasel.  These plants were once harvested to make carding brushes for wool.  They were mounted on wooden boards when dried, and the wool was placed between the carders, and combed  or brushed back and forth until the clean wool was aligned, ready to be spun.

After I initially posted the ink-only drawing, I decided to play once more with the InkTense pencils.  This time I mixed colors together, such as a red-violet and a blue to make the lavenders of the flowers, and yellows and greens and browns in different areas before applying a small amount of water with a water brush.  I’m not sure if I am happy with the colored results, but you never know how something works until you try it, right?

141. In the Park

I refilled a pen with some Private Reserve Copper ink, a water soluble ink, to see how it works as a sketching ink.  The pen is an Aurora with a medium nib, one which I like to use when I need a broader line.  For some reason, maybe it’s just me, but the pen is not writing quite like it did with a different ink.  (Hey, maybe it’s the ink!)  The idea is to see how well the ink blends into the watercolors or affects the colors themselves.

From what I can see, it just merges into the paint without polluting the clarity of the colors.  If you look at the trees on the left, you will see a lot of lines representing the directional flow of the bark.  In other areas, I used the pen to outline white spots or fallen leaves.  In the background, you can see the outlines of the tree trunks.

Besides just playing with ink, I am trying to use simpler swaths of color in my painting to convey a sense of depth.  I struggle with depth – and maybe it is because I don’t have any depth perception – and too often I think my paintings are rather flat in appearance.  Luckily, there are “rules” out there to help me, such a lighter colors in the distance, which I do see.  I just don’t have a sense of dimension.

I wonder how many people really do have eyesight problems – just recently I read that Da Vinci may have eye issues, having one eye which turned outward.  Degas, too.  Others?  Interesting thought.

 

 

139. Inktober #22: Expensive

Hopefully, back on track with Inktober!  I’m not even going to try to do the ones I missed.

This is a combination of ink and Inktense pencils, which I haven’t really tried to any degree.  I started out with just a simple ink drawing, then I used the pencils, laying down pigment with different amounts – light and dark – to see how it would work to create tones.  It did a pretty good job, I think.  Certainly something to continue to play with.

Below is the ink drawing followed by the pre-wetted Inktense pencils.

134. Inktober #13: Guarded

Here I used a fountain pen and a couple of permanent ink drawing pens.  The idea here was to express texture, such as the corrosion on the lock and metal parts of the door, or the wood grain.  Contrast of both texture and tone were important here.  Oh, and to show something “guarded” – what is behind Door Number 13?