Storm Above the Pedernal

Another painting on the reverse of another, again employing dampening the paper before commencing. More hake brush wet-in-wet. I wanted to catch the brilliance of the land beneath the storm as spots of sunshine break through a fast moving storm. In the Southwest, this is common and exciting to see – sometimes the landscape shifts in seconds.

Incoming Storm

Another watercolor, mostly wet-in-wet, but I ended up doing a lot more details in dry brush as the painting progressed. Finally, I applied some glazes in an attempt to unify different sections as I had overworked the painting quite a bit. The even spacing of the brush / trees in the lower middle ground are rather amusing, too – didn’t I look? I didn’t really notice them until I scanned the painting!

Storm Over the Wetlands

Water and sky are the major themes these days.  I really like them anyway, but have to work on reflections in particular.  For instance, along the banks, the reflection of reeds is very important, as in the distant water / tree line.  I try to be simple in my approach and perhaps a bit less dramatic or intense in my colors, but that seems to be really hard for me to achieve!  I had a lot of fun with this painting, though, and am rather pleased with its outcome despite the fact it is not quite what I envisioned.  But, it does catch that peculiar storm light, I think.

Nowhere Barn

Addendum!

This is the second scan from the final one below.  I changed a bit of the elements after doing a preview scan – don’t know why the one on the bottom of this post is so, er, intense!

Now, let us continue . . . 

More perspective studies!  Today I did a single point study.

This time I created a single vanishing point.  This one is below the building, and above the road.  The idea for this is that the road ends up going over a hill or slope before the horizon, at eye level, is met.  I did a pencil sketch and erased it a billion times.  Finally, when I liked what I did, I erased most of the lines after inking it in.

Sort of a value study combined with a color study to see what I might like for color mixes in watercolor.  This paper is mixed media paper, so it is not the heavy Arches 140# cold press I like for most work.  I think the perspective works pretty well.

Well!  Aren’t these colors intense!  The scan for some reason just came out like this – the original is a bit more subtle – but I rather like it as I think it expresses the intensity of color that sometimes comes with lowering clouds and a storm.  Makes me think of my time as a kid on the plains of the midwest.

So, the final study does have decent architectural perspective, and perhaps even some atmospheric (lots of atmosphere, but more like pressure type!) insofar as I tried to simplify things.

I will continue my focus on perspective, and using it in different media.  Watching videos, referring to books, and just doing it is helping.

WWM #29: Glorious Green

In spring, bright new greens fill the world. In summer, greens are darker, interspersed with flowering crops and wild flowers. Color is everywhere, but all dotting a verdant landscape. In brilliant sun, the greens shimmer, but under the electric sky of a thunderstorm, the sudden bursts of sunlight render greens into a strange intensity . . .

“Glorious Green” – prompt #29 – #WorldWatercolorMonth2019.

WWM #16: Relaxing

Painting and relaxing at the beach are perfect expressions of this prompt for #WorldWatercolorMonth2019.

Relaxing – so what comes to mind? I thought of ways I like to relax – reading, going on a hike, baking, going to the beach. The beach won! No matter what the mood, the shore is always a place to relax. Soft wind, strong wind; soft cloudy skies or fierce rain; vast stretches of sand, rocky coasts that are difficult to walk upon.

I don’t do beach sand very well. I dug out a great book, “Take Three Colours: Watercolour Seascapes” by Geoff Kersey.  It’s a nice book for beginners as it explains so many things and techniques, works with a limited palette, and a few brushes.  His samples are illustrated number by number.  I rather like them as they make me think differently – I am a magpie and I go for  50 different colors, not 3!

WWM #16: Relaxing – #1, from a study in “Watercolor Seascapes” by Geoff Kersey

Thus, I warmed up with Kersey’s study called “Sand Dune” – perfect for the beach, I would say.  Not my best, but it was a study in techniques, not a work of art.  Techniques included mixing greens and terra cotta.  I had to substitute Organic Vermilion for his WN Light Red, and play a bit, but I limited myself to the Ultramarine Blue and Cadmium Yellow along with the OV.

WWM #16: Relaxing – Path to the Sea

Warmed up, off to Pixabay!  I wanted something simple and beachy.  This sandy path to the foggy horizon got my attention.  No, you cannot see the ocean, but you know it’s there!  I tried to catch the subtlety of a the fog in the distance, aiming to soften the grasses as the painting moved into the distance.  I also wanted to keep it warm – the foggy day with a bright sun trying to break through.

WWM #16: Relaxing – Sea Grasses Along the Shore

Another image from Pixabay.  I may have painted it before.  There is something so lovely about this beach – deserted, alive with plants and animals, the slap of water on the shore.  I can smell the sea, too:  salty, briney, a bit rank from marshlands.  This painting is also more complex.  I am not sure if I got the sense of distance correct (I have no depth perception), so I worked at making distant items simpler and paler / bluer.  The grasses nearer the beach perhaps could have less detail.  Hmmmm.

WWM #16: Relaxing – Storm Along the Pacific Shore

Finally, a painting from a photo I took several years ago when my friend Glenn and I hit the Central Coast of California, north of Santa Barbara.  We visited Refugio Beach and El Capitan Beach.  I cannot recall which one this was, but the mood was one of wind and cold, and a storm coming or going.  The Pacific was dark, as was the sky; the wind was blustery.  Altogether, it was an adventure!  We were cold and shivery, but so pleased with just being out in the wind and weather.

Of all of the paintings, the last two are my favorites for different reasons.  I painted for about 5 hours, too.  Relaxing?  You bet!  I love the beach, and it was a delight to paint it today.