72. Bush Anemone

Another flower from my ramblings in the botanical garden last weekend.  I may go back tomorrow.

The Bush Anemone – carpenteria californica – is a rather pretty little flower.  Not gaudy, just soft, subtle, and short-bloomed.  I penciled this in first, then used a brush to dab paint off of the tips of my Albrecht Durer watercolor pencils to see how that worked.  Not bad for a small touch here and there!  I then used a light touch with a very fine pointed pen.

39. Squash

Today I have a lot to do, so I thought the best way to start the day would be to do another watercolor pencil drawing.  As I have little to no experience using them, the only way to learn is to use them.  I am making a pencil sketch in a sketch book, and then filling in layers of color before beginning to wet the colors laid down.  The idea is to replicate glazing to a degree.  When I reach a point I like, then I wet a brush, and move from light to dark, maybe moving the brush in a given direction, or not.  Then, more colors, more wetting, and so on.  Below is the final result.

I am not sure that by themselves watercolor pencils are capable of strong contrast.  It seems lines – ink lines – may be helpful.  Or, the pencils themselves can be used in conjunction with other water media, such as watercolors or acrylics or gouache.

Here is the series I scanned in as I moved along.  Click on the pencil drawing to start the series, beginning to end.

38. Morning Frog

I decided to do a quick watercolor pencil sketch before I got ready for work.

First the shape, then the laying down of colors.  The point of this was to be quick!  I just chose colors I thought would work – about 5 or 6 pencils.

Final result.  I used a small round, and worked the lightest areas and moved into darker.  Where I needed more contrast or detail, I used the pencil in the watery areas.

Total time:  about 20 minutes from beginning to end.  Below is each step.